10 x 1 on a road bike...
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dave0w



Joined: 25 Jun 2013
Posts: 236

PostPosted: Mon Oct 31, 2016 9:21 am    Post subject: 10 x 1 on a road bike... Reply with quote

i am thinking of doing a drive train upgrade on my road bike and i was thinking of doing a 10x1 gear system.

right now i have 7x2 and find i never change the front cog i just sits in the same gear, is there any reason i cant do 10x1.

on a side question i have a LOAD of mounting bike gearing is there any reason i cant use a mounting bike derailleur and close range 10 speed cassette?

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Kajjal



Joined: 29 May 2013
Posts: 756

PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 2016 10:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My neighbour has a mtb cassette and rear mech on his road bike, just check they are compatible.

Unless you live somewhere very flat i would be careful going 1 x 10 on a road bike as it either comprises top end speed or you lose hill climbing gears. Having said that it may work well for you.
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Mustard



Joined: 28 Dec 2010
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 03, 2016 9:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've always used an 11/34 9 speed cassette and Deore rear mech on my Roubaix road bike, with standard compact 50/34 up front. No problem.

It gives a wide enough range of gears to climb 1 in 4 hills (and 1 in 3 with an effort) and to pedal at speed on slight downhills or with strong tail winds, (Anything up to 40 m.p.h.)

I fail to see how changing to a single front ring could be called an upgrade if you need to have those benefits! (Unless, of course, you fit a cassette with a ridiculously large big ring which would then need a special rear mech to make it work.)

But what would be the point? What would be gained?
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Jase



Joined: 24 Jan 2011
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Location: Saltaire, W. Yorks

PostPosted: Thu Nov 03, 2016 1:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think it depends on where you ride and the terrain.

If you get the range of gears you need from a 1x10 system then fair enough, but as above it will be very much a "compromise" between top end speed and climbing gears. Also bear in mind the jumps between the gears will be larger on a wide range cassette.

Personally it would only provide limited use for me to run 1x10 and would not fit my needs. Living somewhere flatter would probably change that. Heck, I might even consider a single speed if it was flat for commuting!
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Robmet



Joined: 04 Jan 2010
Posts: 1892

PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2016 4:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just converted my CX bike to 1x10, the first thing I learnt was 10speed MTB derailleurs are not the same cable pull as 10 speed road shifters. I bought a new mech so i could use the the clutch on the mtb derailleur but it didn't work.

Apparently 9 speed MTB derailleurs are the same cable pull but I think they are slightly different and you still cant get them with clutch.

Basically for 10sp you are stuck with road mechs and road shifters, you can use MTB cassettes and chains but the rear mech limits the range of the cassette you can fit.

So after that you need to run a narrow wide ring to stop chain drops and these wont be easy to come by in bigger road sizes, I think they go up to about 42t which is a long way off the 50+ ring you probably have already.

On a CX bike you dont need the top end speed of a road bike so it works, but on a road bike I think you will miss too many gears depending on where you ride.
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Mustard



Joined: 28 Dec 2010
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 05, 2016 9:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Talking about versatility for recreational road riders, I find that 9 speed cassettes (any, but 11/34 for me) with 9 speed M.T.B. rear mech and compact 50/34 front, is as good as it gets. As said, 9 speed road bike shifters work with 9 speed M.T.B. rear mechs.

These unfashionable set ups can be replaced at minimal cost. C.R.C. usually have 9 speed cassettes, 9 speed rear mechs (lower ones such as Diore, which work just fine), and 9 speed chains on offer. (Gratefully taken, and stocked up on. Laughing )

I do wonder why anybody would think that spending £200+ on the latest cassettes can ever be seen as value for money? What do they do that the older cheaper gear can't?
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dave0w



Joined: 25 Jun 2013
Posts: 236

PostPosted: Sun Nov 06, 2016 2:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jase wrote:
I think it depends on where you ride and the terrain.

If you get the range of gears you need from a 1x10 system then fair enough, but as above it will be very much a "compromise" between top end speed and climbing gears. Also bear in mind the jumps between the gears will be larger on a wide range cassette.

Personally it would only provide limited use for me to run 1x10 and would not fit my needs. Living somewhere flatter would probably change that. Heck, I might even consider a single speed if it was flat for commuting!


my front gear as not be changed in about 4 weeks it just sits on the same cog ever day. right now i have a 7 speed rear and i do fine so upping that to a 10 speed can only be a good thing.

and the reason i am thinking of changing is the parts on the bike are very cheap and i get a lot of stutter and change lag.

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Mustard



Joined: 28 Dec 2010
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2016 9:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not expecting a sensible answer but -

What is the logic behind this industry drive towards a single front ring, and who is shoving it? Apart from a slight saving in weight which is pretty meaningless to 'normal' riders when set against the obvious loss in versatility (some touring bikes still have triples with granny rings), and the obvious question of chain line, what's going on?

Chain drive is most efficient when pulling in a straight line. Any deviation from this introduces frictional resistance, not to mention more rapid wear on links and cog wheel teeth. The giveaway is the seeming need for a narrow=wide toothed ring to prevent the chain from jumping off.

So isn't any gain in saving a little weight more than balanced out by a loss of gear versatility, and transmission loss of efficiency at the cassette extremes?

Is it really an advance in technology, or just for the sake of it? (i.e. We can do it, so why not!)
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Magnus



Joined: 18 Jan 2013
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Location: Leicester

PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2016 12:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

well said that man

That is my stance also. Give me versatility every time.

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